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Jules Rimet Was Under My Bed

Football fans packed into the National Football Museum in Manchester last Thursday to attend a Campo Retro hosted event just in time for Brazil ’14.

The event’s main draw was the Jules Rimet trophy for the first time on display allowing everybody to get close up and personal with this famous trophy. The story of the Jules Rimet Trophy has many aspects beginning with the story of how it came to be stolen in 1966 and then discovered one week later by Pickles the dog to the lesser known story of the replica version that “officially” never existed until 1995. From being under somebody’s bed for 25 years to the sale of this trophy at a Sotheby’s auction in 1997 to a “private buyer” that turned out to be FIFA.

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‘Jules Rimet Was Under My Bed’ featured Ryan Steele, the Collections Officer at the National Football Museum, Martin Atherton, author of ‘The Theft of the Jules Rimet Trophy’, and David Blanch, Head of Design at Campo Retro.

The event was presented by Hugh Ferris of BBC 5 Live and, alongside the Jules Rimet Trophy, was the original shirt worn by Bobby Moore and his England team for the Mexico 1970 World Cup which was famously swapped with Pele.

With fascinating talks and intriguing insight into the history of the trophy and hosted at the National Football Museum, the event was the ideal lead-up to the World Cup.

Ray Evans, MD at Campo Retro, said:

“The ‘Jules Rimet Was Under My Bed’ event came about following our creative process that involved deep insight and research to create our Brasil 14’ collection.

“We were incredibly intrigued as we uncovered more and more about the history of the Jules Rimet. We just knew football fans would love to learn more and we couldn’t wait to share our findings with a wider audience.

“The event was a great success. We’re thrilled with the level of interest people showed, and that we got the chance to tell this amazing story in the perfect venue – the National Football Museum.”

If you didn’t get a chance to attend the talk, watch the official trailer of the event to find out all about the Jules Rimet’s mysterious disappearance:

With the World Cup on the horizon and the extravaganza that comes with it and for football fans who are going to want to show their colours with pride without cutting corners in the style department, Campo Retro have it covered with their brand new Brasil ’14 Collection.

90% Cotton, 10% Air, 100% Cool.

Inspired by the mesh shirts of the 1970 World Cup in Mexico, Campo’s Brasil ’14 Collection includes 12 international teams from the likes of Argentina and Germany to France and USA and comes with personalisation options, so you can adorn your shirt with the international legends you worshipped as a kid.

Campo Managing Director Ray Evans said,

“We wanted to celebrate the upcoming World Cup in Brazil with a unique proposition. We wanted to reinvent what retro means. Taking inspiration from history and adding the Campo touch.”

These one-off shirts are individually designed with an exclusive Victory Crest, which takes influence from the Jules Rimet trophy, the World Cup winners’ medals and Brazil’s famous Christ the Redeemer statue.”

CAMPO RETRO SHIRTS – a review of the Centenario Jersey

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My friends at Campo Retro were kind enough to send me one of their top notch retro shirts to review.

I got the top of the Team Colours range shirt, the long-sleeved Centenario, in navy and old white.

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The parcel arrived at work today, and Campo really make a lot of effort to ensure that the whole package (no pun intended) is bob on.

The outer postage sack contained the folded and bagged shirt plus a badge, carefully wrapped in Campo printed paper.

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Now, I have to admit that I’m not a big fan of replica shirts, especially the shiny, polyester ones that retail for between £45 and £65! I don’t do man-made fibres, but I do do cotton; and the Campo shirt is crafted from lots and lots of the stuff – lovely 100 per cent soft handle luxury 200grm cotton fibre. It feels great, and the construction looks bulletproof, with the football shirt resembling the cotton top I had to wear for football and rugby in games lessons at school that lasted me five years!

The Centenario is modelled on the very earliest football shirts, which were themselves modelled on the contemporary rugby and other sporting tops of the time, as can be seen on display at the National Football Museum.

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An old football jersey, on display at The National Football Museum

Campo describe the shirt as:

…a fusion of modern attention to detail and classic tailored style seen in the early 50’s. It features a smart covered button placket with a contrast mini stripe under its tailored collar, together with smart flush finish cuffs.

Lots of individual processes have gone into making the shirt, with an amazing level of attention to detail. The yoke at the back of the neck is reinforced, as is the armpit area, which has a diamond-shaped gusset to aid with movement and prevent the stitches from bursting.

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The covered buttoned placket and collar are also things of beauty, and you can really see the thought and effort that have gone into producing the garment.

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Campo have designed the entire Stadio range to be customised to your favourite team with a neat little Campo branded pin badge housing on the hem. I got a black and white badge included with my shirt, but I could also use any of the pin badges with butterfly fixings from my extensive hipster and classic badge collection if I so desire, safe in the knowledge that the badge won’t damage my shirt by putting pin holes in it!

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Pin housing & embroidered arm logo

Another nice touch is the embroidered Campo logo on the right sleeve, in self-coloured stitching so as not to be too shouty.

Like the last England shirts to be made by Umbro, this is a smart casual shirt that is as much at home in a bar on a Friday or Saturday night as it is on the terraces on a matchday. As I wanted to go for a smart casual look, I didn’t specify the optional extra number personalisation, but Campo can stitch a high quality cotton canvas number to the back of the shirt if you like.

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I am looking forward to living with the Centenario in my wardrobe, and seeing how it ages after wearing and washing it. I expect a good level of colour fastness based on the quality I’ve seen so far, as long as I follow the washing instructions of course, and for it to last me a long, long time. I’ll update this post with comments on the fit and how it washes once I’ve lived with it for a bit.

You can buy the Centenario jersey here, and view the rest of the extensive Campo Retro range.

Follow Campo on Twitter – @CampoRetro

Lastly, here’s the mighty Ivan Campo – just because I can!

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WHO ARE YA? Kevin Moore, Director, National Football Museum

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Kevin Moore, Director, National Football Museum

1) Who are ya?

Kevin Moore. 53

2) Who do you support?

Tranmere Rovers

3) What was your first game?

Wolves v Leeds, 1968 (0-0)

4) What do you do for a job?

Director, National Football Museum. I lead the world’s biggest and best football museum! We opened a new National Football Museum in Manchester in July 2012, and attracted over 450,000 visitors in the first year. This built on the success we had in Preston, where the Museum originally opened in 2001. The Museum is in the heart of Manchester and admission is free!

5) Have you played/worked for any football clubs?

No.

6) How did you get into it?

My background is as a University Lecturer (History, Museum Studies), and as a Museum Curator. In 1997 I was appointed as the first Director of the National Football Museum in Preston. The Museum opened in 2001 and we attracted over 100,000 visitors each year.  The collections are still held in store in Preston, while the displays are now in Manchester. We hold the world’s greatest collections, over 140,000 items, including the FIFA Collection.

7) What do you get out of it?

It’s a dream job! We preserve the unique history of football in England, and create displays which have had a fantastic reaction from our visitors. We also have a great learning offer for schools and colleges.

8) What advice would you give someone wanting to follow in your stud marks/footsteps?

We strongly encourage and support fans who are preserving the history of their club and who are attempting to set up their own museums. And our own team is growing!

9) If you could do it all again what would you change?

Nothing!

10) Who’s your footballing hero?

Sir Bobby Charlton was my hero in the 1960s, so it’s a great thrill for me that he is the President of the Museum.

WHO ARE YA? Jon Sutton, Creative Programmes Officer at The National Football Museum in Manchester

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Jon Sutton, Creative Programmes Officer at the National Football Museum

1) Who are ya?

Jon Sutton, 32, born in sunny Blackpool, living in Urmston, Manchester

2) Who do you support?

Blackpool

3) What was your first game?

11th November 1989, Blackpool 4 Brentford 0…sat in a wooden seat in a wooden stand at a crumbling unchanged Bloomfield Road in front of less than 3,000 fans with the smell of pipe smoke wafting in the air. It was the high point of that season as we ended up getting relegated to the Fourth Division!

4) What do you do for a job?

I’m Creative Programmes Officer at the National Football Museum in Manchester. I was involved in the initial project when we moved from our old site in Preston working on some of the themed zones in the permanent displays. Since we opened I’m part of the team responsible for the museum’s temporary exhibitions programme which has included West African art, photography, football and fashion and our current exhibition celebrating 125 years of The Football League. I’m also involved in small displays we have of contemporary art and some of the events we do in our public programme.

5) Have you played/worked for any football clubs?

I worked at the Manchester United Museum as curatorial assistant for three years where I worked with their collection and displays. I also used to sell programmes at Blackpool when I was a teenager, 10p per programme commission and free entry to the match!

6) How did you get into it?

I did a degree on Politics and History at the University of Central Lancashire which included a heritage studies module which really interested me. From this moment on I realised I wanted to work in a Museum. I then volunteered at the Grundy Art Gallery in Blackpool and Astley Hall Museum in Chorley before undertaking a Masters degree in Arts and Museum Management at the University of Salford. As part of my Masters degree I did a placement at the Football Museum when it was in Preston working with their FIFA World Cup collection and the rest is history!

7) What do you get out of it?

It’s a fantastic place to work, who wouldn’t want to be involved in the biggest and best football museum in the World?! We have over 140,000 objects in our collection and playing my part in the Museum helping preserve the history of the People’s game via our displays and changing exhibitions so they can reach out to as many people as possible is something I’m proud of.

8) What advice would you give someone wanting to follow in your stud marks/footsteps?

Picking the right course at university is key and making sure you get experience in the relevant field can always get your foot on the ladder.

9) If you could do it all again what would you change?

I suppose I might have tried to get more work experience in Museums prior to starting my Masters degree, as it gives you more of an insight into work than any course can.

10) Who’s your footballing hero?

My first hero was Blackpool left winger David Eyres who played for the club from 1989-1992 and went on to play for Burnley, Preston and Oldham. Billy Ayre was a great Blackpool manager from the early 90s who got us promoted on a shoestring budget and sadly passed away at the age of just 49 in 2002. My biggest hero though is probably manager Ian Holloway who took us up to the Premier League in 2010 and very nearly kept us there against the odds. Seeing Blackpool beat Liverpool and Spurs and play stylish attacking football was something I never thought I’d see in my lifetime and when he left the club to join Crystal Palace I was devastated. It still hurts and the current situation at Blackpool under Paul Ince makes the Holloway era seem a distant memory.

Many thanks, Jon.

Visit the National Football Museum

WHO ARE YA? Callum Baxter, Business Development Manager at the National Football Museum

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Callum Baxter, Business Development Manager at the National Football Museum

1) Who are ya?

Callum Baxter, 27, born in Ormskirk (Lancashire), lives in Manchester, has a scouse accent.

2) Who do you support?

Everton

3) What was your first game?

I remember my first game being Aston Villa away, I think it was the 96/97 season and it was one of Dave Watson few games as caretaker manager. I can’t remember much of the game but I do remember a young, teenage Richard Dunne coming as a substitute to make his debut.

4) What do you do for a job?

I’m the Business Development Manager at the National Football Museum. With the museum being a charity and relying on donations, it’s my job to make the museum money in other areas. This can take on the form of sponsorship and working with brands, companies who would like to hire the museum as a venue for an event or loaning items from our collection. The 1966 World Cup Final ball or Jules Rimet trophy are two of the most prized items in our collection of over 145,000 pieces.

5) Have you played/worked for any football clubs?

I worked for Burnley Football Club in their media department on work experience during my university years.

6) How did you get into it?

I’d probably say my degree was the defining factor in getting my job. I studied Football and Society and Journalism at the University of Central Lancashire.

7) What do you get out of it?

I love being able to play my part in helping to preserve the heritage of the beautiful game. We exist to explain why England is the home of football, the birthplace of the world’s most popular sport and I’d like to think that I’m helping the museums long-term mission and responsibility to protect football’s heritage and culture for future generations as well as current audiences.

8) What advice would you give someone wanting to follow in your stud marks/footsteps?

The only advice I could give here is pick the right degree, I had an idea of what I wanted to do when I was at university and I dreamt of working for the National Football Museum, and luckily, my dream has come true. So, have a think of what you want to do because, the degree you pick at university matters! I would definitely advise to get some good work experience as well, the time I served at Burnley Football Club, albeit only for a month, it was unbelievable experience.

9) If you could do it all again what would you change?

I would go back and I would have tried to get more experience working in different departments at different clubs. I managed to interview Jon Harley prior to an FA Cup tie with Arsenal while at Burnley, which ended being on the front page of the programme and the centre piece – Fire emails off and make contact with anyone asking for work experience!

10) Who’s your footballing hero?

Growing up I was absolutely obsessed with Duncan Ferguson. He may have let us down on a few occasions (the occasional red card) but he was a hero to me and he loved a goal against Manchester United…

Many thanks, Callum.

The National Football Museum website – www.nationalfootballmuseum.com

This week’s adventures in Social Media

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Tony Agana, SUFC

This week’s adventures in Social Media include:

  • Connecting on Linked In with the legendary Tony Agana (following on from my Twitter conversation with him and Brian Deane last week)
  • Having a protracted Twitter conversation with Got, Not Got about the ethics of buying their latest book (‘What a Shot’) second hand and at a vastly reduced rate
  • Getting over a 1000 views on No Standing last Friday
  • Kicking off my football folk Q&A series, ‘Who are ya?’
  • Talking about arts projects at Horton Park Avenue and football blogging with The National Football Museum (and Socrates Meet Ups)
  • Discussing the relative merits of WordPress with The Football Attic
  • Debating whether I could get away with filling my house with old Shoot! and Match magazines with my Tweeps Matt Bailey and Scots Footy Cards
  • Finding out that there had been a touchline scrap at an Under-13s game in the suburb of Norwich where I used to live
  • Clarifying with Beyond the Last Man that Vic Metcalfe of Huddersfield Town WAS NOT my Grandmother
  • Discovering that the good folk of Holmewood in Bradford don’t like talkented photographers who wear corduroy
  • Looking at why referees AREN’T wankers