Taking a turn ‘in the woods,’ confronting the goalkeeper’s choice

“Philosophers, theologians and writers know the necessity of acting on uncertainty. To Blaise Pascal, life is a gamble: “We ought to work for an uncertainty according to the doctrine of chance.” Existentialist writers of the 20th century found in goalkeeping and in goalkeepers a paradigm for reasserting the moral imperative of action.

“Existentialist thought, of course, does not have its roots in Albert Camus—the Nobel Prize–winning goalkeeper to whom I will return—or Jean-Paul Sartre, but before. Well before Dante, whose Commedia theologian Paul Tillich refers to as the finest poetic expression of existential despair. Tillich finds the fundamental statement in Platonic thought. Plato realizes that existence in a transitory world alienates a person from an ideal, from the idea of being, from a divine essence that seems without substance in the world of human cares.”

From “Taking a turn ‘in the woods,’ confronting the goalkeeper’s choice“, The Global Game

The lexicon of glove

The Goldstone Wrap

powney2c

As far as retro football magazines go, The Footballer was the forerunner to Backpass magazine, running from July 1989 to May/June 1996. While it was much drier in tone and page layout than its modern day retro equivalent, many of the respectfully penned articles and interviews of players from yesteryear deserve another airing.

This one by Charlie Bamforth, from the March / April 1996 edition, features the spring-heeled Brian Powney, who kept goal for the Albion from 1962 to 1974:

Brian Powney ushered his Staffordshire Bull Terrier out of the room (for which I was thankful) and gestured to the walking stick propped up against his easy chair: “That stick is the legacy of a knee injury I picked up on my debut for Brighton when I was 16!”

Gammy knee or not, Powney went on to play almost 400 games for the Seagulls. The stresses and strains are now…

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