Ebay football boot advert trawl

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INTERSPORT World Cup 90 Edition Catalogue Match Insert

I bought a load of Match magazines from 1990 recently, and in one of them was this great INTERSPORT catalogue insert.

Being 1990 and all, everything’s gone a bit dayglo and rave-y, with shellsuits, loud graphics, geometric patterns woven into the man-made fibre shirts, and unnecessary spot colour on the boots!

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The front cover – featuring happy England & Scotland footballers!

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England & Scotland kits, and a young Owen Hargreaves!

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His & Hers Scotland kit, plus Andy Roxburgh & Sir Bobby Robson…

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A handy visual guide to Italy, DIadora gear, & other nation’s adidas shirts…

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The Groups, & youth wear…

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Boots, balls & goalie gloves…

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More boots & balls…

Prices vary, but you’re looking at a very expensive (for the time) £59.99 for the Diadora Magic Van Basten boots! But then they are pro level.

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The back cover – INTERSPORT shops nationwide. Remember any of them?

I grew up with Pilch’s in Norwich, and lived in Nottingham for 20 years so knew the Broadmarsh Shopping Centre well. I live in Bradford now, and Bridge Street is a faint shadow of what it once was. Nostalgia, tinged with sadness at the passing of so many great sports shops…

Pity the poor kangaroo

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adidas World Cup Football Boots

Kangaroo leather is a strong light weight leather derived from the hide of kangaroos.

It used to be used in professional-level football boots and tennis shoes, such as the Diadora Borg Elite, due to it’s ability to be cut down to a very thin substance (the thickness of the leather) but still retain its strength.

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Diadora Borg Elite Gold

Studies conducted by the Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) confirm that kangaroo is one of the strongest leathers of similar substance available.

Animal welfare groups have been calling for a boycott of kangaroo leather amid concerns over the culling of the kangaroos for their hides.

adidas has agreed to end the use of kangaroo leather for the prestige boots worn by Premier League stars following the complaints about animal cruelty.

The Daily Mail reported in September 2012 that:
“In the past, all the major manufacturers have used kangaroo skin for boots worn by stars from David Beckham to Frank Lampard and John Terry

“Beckham stopped wearing kangaroo leather boots in 2006 after he was given details of the controversial slaughter methods, but other stars and firms like Adidas refused to stop using the skins.

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The Predator range of boots from adidas is now made without kangaroo leather

“The move by adidas followed pressure from ethical investors, specifically the British organisation Co-op Asset Management.

“The firm said: ‘We engaged with adidas in connection with their continued use of kangaroo leather. We noted positively the successful transition of the Predator range that no longer contains kangaroo leather and that within the next 12 months Adidas will have reduced their sourcing volume for kangaroo leather by 98 per cent.’

“British animal welfare group Viva! has worked closely with the Australian Wildlife Protection Council(AWPC) in campaigns to prevent the sale of kangaroo products, including meat.

“Both yesterday issued a guarded joint congratulation to the German giant for its ethical decision to move away from the use of wildlife in its global business.

“They said the move will save thousands of these animals from being shot and spare their babies from being clubbed to death.

“Other boot manufacturers are also cutting their use of kangaroo skin following animal welfare group campaigns.

“Philip Woolley, EU Campaign Director of the AWPC and head of international operations, said: ‘Having worked tirelessly for over ten years to get sports companies like Adidas to stop using kangaroo skin, the news of Adidas dropping their use on ethical and animal welfare grounds, is just a fantastic result.

“‘We congratulate both Adidas and the Co-Op for their positive approach to stop this trade and help save the lives of almost one million baby kangaroos each year.’”