Jules Rimet Was Under My Bed

Football fans packed into the National Football Museum in Manchester last Thursday to attend a Campo Retro hosted event just in time for Brazil ’14.

The event’s main draw was the Jules Rimet trophy for the first time on display allowing everybody to get close up and personal with this famous trophy. The story of the Jules Rimet Trophy has many aspects beginning with the story of how it came to be stolen in 1966 and then discovered one week later by Pickles the dog to the lesser known story of the replica version that “officially” never existed until 1995. From being under somebody’s bed for 25 years to the sale of this trophy at a Sotheby’s auction in 1997 to a “private buyer” that turned out to be FIFA.

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‘Jules Rimet Was Under My Bed’ featured Ryan Steele, the Collections Officer at the National Football Museum, Martin Atherton, author of ‘The Theft of the Jules Rimet Trophy’, and David Blanch, Head of Design at Campo Retro.

The event was presented by Hugh Ferris of BBC 5 Live and, alongside the Jules Rimet Trophy, was the original shirt worn by Bobby Moore and his England team for the Mexico 1970 World Cup which was famously swapped with Pele.

With fascinating talks and intriguing insight into the history of the trophy and hosted at the National Football Museum, the event was the ideal lead-up to the World Cup.

Ray Evans, MD at Campo Retro, said:

“The ‘Jules Rimet Was Under My Bed’ event came about following our creative process that involved deep insight and research to create our Brasil 14’ collection.

“We were incredibly intrigued as we uncovered more and more about the history of the Jules Rimet. We just knew football fans would love to learn more and we couldn’t wait to share our findings with a wider audience.

“The event was a great success. We’re thrilled with the level of interest people showed, and that we got the chance to tell this amazing story in the perfect venue – the National Football Museum.”

If you didn’t get a chance to attend the talk, watch the official trailer of the event to find out all about the Jules Rimet’s mysterious disappearance:

With the World Cup on the horizon and the extravaganza that comes with it and for football fans who are going to want to show their colours with pride without cutting corners in the style department, Campo Retro have it covered with their brand new Brasil ’14 Collection.

90% Cotton, 10% Air, 100% Cool.

Inspired by the mesh shirts of the 1970 World Cup in Mexico, Campo’s Brasil ’14 Collection includes 12 international teams from the likes of Argentina and Germany to France and USA and comes with personalisation options, so you can adorn your shirt with the international legends you worshipped as a kid.

Campo Managing Director Ray Evans said,

“We wanted to celebrate the upcoming World Cup in Brazil with a unique proposition. We wanted to reinvent what retro means. Taking inspiration from history and adding the Campo touch.”

These one-off shirts are individually designed with an exclusive Victory Crest, which takes influence from the Jules Rimet trophy, the World Cup winners’ medals and Brazil’s famous Christ the Redeemer statue.”

Photo competition with Campo Retro winner

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Congratulations to Non League Review – winner of the No Standing & Campo Retro photo competition.

There were several pictures in the running from the many entries we received, including shots from Geraint Duckfield and Laurence Reade, but we felt that the picture above was the most evocative and, therefore, deserved to win.

Thanks to everyone that submitted their football shots.

No Standing x Campo Retro photo competition

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As I head towards my 1000th blog post, No Standing and Campo Retro have come together to offer all football fans around the world a fantastic opportunity to win a unique and personalized Campo Retro football shirt with free delivery, to anywhere.

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Campo Retro have a wide range of retro shirts available, with classic shirts and track jackets ranging from the 1950s to the 2000s. Not only that, but Campo Retro will also print/stitch any name and number that you want on the back of the shirt to make it extra special.

This competition is open to entrants from all over the world, so whether you live in Liverpool, Lisbon, Lahore, Linden or LA, you still have a great chance of winning this fantastic prize. It’s not where you’re from, it’s where you’re at.

It couldn’t be simpler to enter this competition, all you have to do is send in a picture of something football-related that you’ve taken yourself and email the photo to competitions@camposports.com

Whether it’s you at the game on Saturday, playing Sunday League, in your back garden with your children playing footy, a groundhopping picture of some floodlights or pyrotechnic display, or an arty shot from the Stuart Roy Clarke school of football photography, the best photo wins.It’s that simple.Wow us or make us laugh but be creative.

The competition closes on the 31st of May, 2014 and the winner will be announced soon after.

The winner will receive an email from Campo Retro to request information on shirt size, personalization and delivery address. All entries will also receive an exclusive discount to use at www.camporetro.com

GOOD LUCK!

NEAR POST – New England shirt to cost up to £90!!!

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BBC Sport reported yesterday that Nike were making the same shirts that the England players will wear in Brazil in the summer available to the general public, but that they will cost up to £90!

The following is from the BBC Sport website article ‘World Cup 2014: England shirts’ £90 price tag ‘takes the mickey”:

Shadow Sports Minister Clive Efford said the pricing strategy was “disappointing” while Queens Park Rangers midfielder Joey Barton called it “appalling” and “taking the mickey”.

The most expensive Nike “match shirts” will be identical to the ones worn at this summer’s World Cup finals.

The FA said it avoids any involvement with kit manufacturers about pricing.

Alternative “stadium” shirts are priced at £60, while versions for children aged between eight and 15 cost £42.

The £90 shirts have enhanced “cooling technology” compared to the £60 shirts, according to Nike’s website.

Efford said: “I’m disappointed that fans are being asked to pay up to £90 for a new England shirt.

“The game of football seems to be increasingly about profit and commercialism rather than the community and the fans, who have sustained football for many generations.”

The previous Nike home kit has only been around since last May – seven England matches [eight, actually – GM] – after the manufacturer took over from Umbro, and Efford said that also hit parents hard.

He added: “The frequency with which these kits are changed adds to the expense. When it comes to buying for more than one child it gets extremely expensive and people on moderate or low incomes are excluded from that privilege.”

Barton said on Twitter: “£90 for the new England shirt is taking the mickey out of the fans. When will it stop? Appalling. In my opinion. Football again allows commercialism to eat away at its soul. Something has got to give.”

In a statement, English football’s governing body said: “The FA is a not-for-profit organisation that puts £100m back into the game every year.

“It is through relationships with partners such as Nike that we are able to maintain that level of investment in football.

“The FA’s policy is to avoid any involvement with how its partners/licensees set their prices, so as to avoid any risk of or implications of price fixing.”

A Football Supporters’ Federation spokesman said: “Fans with kids often argue that strips are changed too often. The FSF would advocate manufacturers incorporating a ‘best before’ date into the strip’s label. Supporters buying a strip would then know exactly what they’re paying for and be able to make a decision based on that.”

England fans’ spokesman Mark Perryman said sales of the shirts would be based more on the team’s performance at the World Cup than the price.

Perryman said: “I think the prices are ridiculous compared to what they cost to produce.

“Commercially, if you go back through history, the most successful England shirts in terms of sales have been the ones from periods when England are doing well.

“To that end, I think Nike have got a bum deal because expectations ahead of the World Cup are at an all-time low. People are just not that excited about the England team.

“Who in their right mind thinks we are going to do well in Brazil?”

Exactly.

Well, if you can afford to shell out the asking price for a new Nike shirt then fair play to you, but there are plenty of alternatives from previous England World Cup campaigns by retro shirt companies like Admiral Sportswear, Umbro, Campo and TOFFS out there if you want to wear a replica shirt from yesteryear.

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The famous England 1966 Bobby Moore shirt heralds back to our only World Cup title so far, whilst the England 1982 home shirt was a classic worn as the three lions of England took on the world’s elite in Espana 82.

At the end of the day, Saint, you pay your money and take your choice…