CAMPO RETRO SHIRTS – a review of the Centenario Jersey

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My friends at Campo Retro were kind enough to send me one of their top notch retro shirts to review.

I got the top of the Team Colours range shirt, the long-sleeved Centenario, in navy and old white.

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The parcel arrived at work today, and Campo really make a lot of effort to ensure that the whole package (no pun intended) is bob on.

The outer postage sack contained the folded and bagged shirt plus a badge, carefully wrapped in Campo printed paper.

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Now, I have to admit that I’m not a big fan of replica shirts, especially the shiny, polyester ones that retail for between £45 and £65! I don’t do man-made fibres, but I do do cotton; and the Campo shirt is crafted from lots and lots of the stuff – lovely 100 per cent soft handle luxury 200grm cotton fibre. It feels great, and the construction looks bulletproof, with the football shirt resembling the cotton top I had to wear for football and rugby in games lessons at school that lasted me five years!

The Centenario is modelled on the very earliest football shirts, which were themselves modelled on the contemporary rugby and other sporting tops of the time, as can be seen on display at the National Football Museum.

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An old football jersey, on display at The National Football Museum

Campo describe the shirt as:

…a fusion of modern attention to detail and classic tailored style seen in the early 50’s. It features a smart covered button placket with a contrast mini stripe under its tailored collar, together with smart flush finish cuffs.

Lots of individual processes have gone into making the shirt, with an amazing level of attention to detail. The yoke at the back of the neck is reinforced, as is the armpit area, which has a diamond-shaped gusset to aid with movement and prevent the stitches from bursting.

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The covered buttoned placket and collar are also things of beauty, and you can really see the thought and effort that have gone into producing the garment.

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Campo have designed the entire Stadio range to be customised to your favourite team with a neat little Campo branded pin badge housing on the hem. I got a black and white badge included with my shirt, but I could also use any of the pin badges with butterfly fixings from my extensive hipster and classic badge collection if I so desire, safe in the knowledge that the badge won’t damage my shirt by putting pin holes in it!

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Pin housing & embroidered arm logo

Another nice touch is the embroidered Campo logo on the right sleeve, in self-coloured stitching so as not to be too shouty.

Like the last England shirts to be made by Umbro, this is a smart casual shirt that is as much at home in a bar on a Friday or Saturday night as it is on the terraces on a matchday. As I wanted to go for a smart casual look, I didn’t specify the optional extra number personalisation, but Campo can stitch a high quality cotton canvas number to the back of the shirt if you like.

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I am looking forward to living with the Centenario in my wardrobe, and seeing how it ages after wearing and washing it. I expect a good level of colour fastness based on the quality I’ve seen so far, as long as I follow the washing instructions of course, and for it to last me a long, long time. I’ll update this post with comments on the fit and how it washes once I’ve lived with it for a bit.

You can buy the Centenario jersey here, and view the rest of the extensive Campo Retro range.

Follow Campo on Twitter – @CampoRetro

Lastly, here’s the mighty Ivan Campo – just because I can!

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WHO ARE YA? Craig Renshaw, Administrator for the University of Bolton, & BWFC Turnstile Operator

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Craig Renshaw, Administrator for the University of Bolton, & BWFC Turnstile Operator

1) Who are ya?

Craig Renshaw, 23.

2) Who do you support?

Bolton Wanderers (still!) [Good lad – GM]

3) What was your first game?

Oxford United in 1996, FA cup tie, I think? [Bolton played Oxford in the league that season, at Oxford in November 1996, and at Burnden Park in April 1997 – GM]

4) What do you do for a job?

An Administrator for the University of Bolton, and I operate a turnstile for Bolton Wanderers on matchdays.

5) Have you played/worked for any football clubs?

Yes, as above – as a Turnstile Operator for BWFC.

6) How did you get into it?

I needed some work experience whilst I was at University, and a family friend gave me the contact details of someone at Bolton. That was my way in.

7) What do you get out of it?

I get to help the team I’ve supported all my life, and get to see a bit of the football most of the time. I also get to build rapport with the fans, which is always fun.

8) What advice would you give someone wanting to follow in your stud marks/footsteps?

Just ask around, there’s always jobs connected to clubs you support, get involved, whether its paid or voluntary and you won’t regret it.

9) If you could do it all again what would you change?

Actually play for BWFC! Saying that, they could really do with me right about now! [Too right – GM]

10) Who’s your footballing hero?

Jay Jay Okocha – so good they named him twice!

Cheers Craig. I hope to see you at the Reebok turnstiles one of these days.

WHO ARE YA? Bill Eaton, LFA referee, tutor, mentor and assessor

1) Who are ya?

Bill Eaton, LFA referee, tutor, mentor and assessor. Referee development office for the Bolton, Bury and District Football League. UAFA C Coach, Born and bred in Bolton.

2) Who do you support?

Support my local team of course, BWFC (GM – good lad)

3) What was your first game?

As a referee I turned up to do a game at a venue where there was ten games, referees where allocated to each game. Some kind referee swapped games. I was stuck with the Grantham Arms v Chamberlain Arms, two local pub teams who made my life hell for 90 minutes. Sent half a dozen of them to their local FA.

As a coach of Eastleigh Tornados in our first ever match, 27 years ago, my team was getting slaughtered when a parent asked me why I only had ten players on the pitch… I then noticed one of my players was sat next to the opposition goal keeper (Sean Wren) making a daisy chain!

4) What do you do for a job?

Work for the Cohens Chemist Group

5) Have you played/worked for any football clubs?

Worked for the PFA at BWFC at the old Burnden Park as a school community coach and also as the clubs educational officer.

6) How did you get into it?

Started coaching by accident, went to join a men’s team and turned up early where kids were training. Manager needed a lot of help so stepped in.

As a referee, got asked to referee a friends team and really enjoyed it, so took the course and qualified.

7) What do you get out of it?

Love helping develop young referees, always gave u18s referees priority in games. Appointed over 200 of them to cup finals in the BBDFL

8) What advice would you give someone wanting to follow in your stud marks/footsteps?

To young referees is to command your game, don’t let managers/coaches/spectators ruin your enjoyment. You’re there to support the junior players. Do as many games as you can. Always save a bit of your ref fee, so when things go bad, buy yourself something to cheer yourself up.

9) If you could do it all again what would you change?

Not giving up refereeing for about 12 years, not getting bird flu… I was flying a few seasons ago and getting superb appointments, got a county cup quarter final and a women’s FA Cup game. Then the bird flu kicked in, missed both matches, was ill for two weeks. Fitness never recovered.

10) Who’s your footballing hero?

Has to be Bruce Rioch and the Special One, great managers.

Going to the Match, LS Lowry

Going to the Match, LS Lowry

Going to the Match, LS Lowry